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How omega-3 and exercise may help those suffering from Alzheimer's Current information on the latest drug therapies for treating AIDs What you need to know about H1N1 virus Nutritional information for combating prostate cancer Leading research on menopause and bio identical hormones And much, much more In the twenty years since the first edition was released, the natural health movement has gone mainstream, and the quest for optimal nutrition is no longer relegated to speciality stores. ULs are part of Dietary Reference Intakes. According to Walter Gratzer , the study of nutrition probably began during the 6th century BC. Increased weight, especially in the form of belly fat, and high sugar intake are also high risk factors for heart disease. Examines international policies that promote regional solutions for a safe food supply and access to nutritious foods.

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Uses contemporary readings, films, and critical discussion to explore these macro-scale influences on food, nutrition, and eating behavior. Addresses energy-producing pathways, as well as food sources, digestion, absorption, and utilization of carbohydrates, protein, and various micronutrients.

Additional topics include low-carbohydrate diets, vegetarianism, protein deficiency, and inborn errors in carbohydrate and protein metabolism. NUTR Nutrition and Metabolism II 3 Discussion of normal lipid components of animal tissues, with review of their metabolism and physiological functions.

Topics include digestion, absorption, transport, and utilization of dietary fats, cholesterol, and fat-soluble vitamins. Discusses in-depth the roles played by lipids and various micronutrients in altering risk of atherosclerosis. To include absorption, transport, function, storage, and excretion; imbalance, deficiency, and toxicity; dietary structures; and role of these nutrients in prevention of diseases directly or indirectly.

NUTR Maternal and Pediatric Nutrition 4 Examines the influence of maternal, infant, and children's nourishment on growth, development, and health, including children with special healthcare needs, in both individual and population-based environments.

Includes nutrition and assessment, critical evaluation of normative data, and evidence-based clinical and community nutritional care and family-centered care. Evaluation of experimental design, research protocols, data analyses, and data presentations. NUTR Public Health Nutrition 4 Explores the functions and essential services of public health as they apply to assuring access to a safe and nutritious food supply.

Examines the practice of public health nutrition: NUTR Nutrition Education Principles and Practice 2 Examines theory-based design and delivery of nutrition education, including conducting needs assessments and developing lesson plans, activities, visual aids, and evaluation material. Explores design features of written, oral, and technology-based nutrition education materials and initiatives.

Addresses differing learning styles, cultural groups, and literacy levels. Provides hands-on experience in laboratory research. Introduces the student to ongoing research for preparation of dissertation topics. NUTR Nutritional Epidemiology 3 Application of epidemiological methods to studies of diet, nutrition, and chronic disease. A discussion of current issues and controversies enables students to design studies and read the literature in nutritional epidemiology.

Examines international policies that promote regional solutions for a safe food supply and access to nutritious foods. NUTR Nutrition in Developing Countries 3 Introduces issues of nutrition in developing countries, with an emphasis on the control and prevention of undernutrition and micronutrient deficiencies.

NUTR Orientation to Clinical Dietetics Practice 3 Provides an orientation to dietetics in clinical settings, including the nutrition care process and integration of evidence-based practice. It also gives information about the benefits of all vitamins, symptoms of deficiency and information about many many herbs and supplements.

The only book that is superior to this one is the Holy Bible! I refer to it constantly. And the best health food store in Denver has a copy of it on a podium for use by customers and staff. And this new edition is even better than the previous ones. You never know when you may need to "call" on it!

Just over a year ago, a good friend of ours stopped by saying that his wife was very sick having been diagnosed with cirrhosis of the liver. She was nor is a drinker. He was not expecting her to be on this earth for much longer. At that time someone had lent us an older version of this book for another situation. After our friend left we immediately looked up what this book had to say and got the information to our dying friend.

As she began to follow the directions of what not to eat etc. She had got that she could not walk, was extremely thin and yes, looked like death was on her doorstep. When asked about helping someone else with a different diagnosis we figured it was time to purchase this book for ourselves. Pages and pages of information and helpful advice to set you back on your feet towards a healthy life.

We purchased this book used. We were not required to write a review but chose to do so. Which is rather common among people of western European ancestory. The doctors told us to prepare for their death. So I went to my local hippy health food store which I frequented on occasion and spoke to the owner. He opened his hippy store bible this book and showed me the things it would take to help purge the toxins and restore the liver.

I had the doctor discharge her into my care to come home to die. She had a nurse coming to the house and was being interveinously hydrated etc. I began the hippy regiment immediately. The doctors were astonished. Healing the body is not what medications do. The care and treatment this book guides us to is where true healing can occur. What is the body missing?

What is the catalysis that the problem stemmed from in the first place? I decided to come back and write a review of this book 6 years later because the book was sitting next to me as I type and I figured why not? I have owned a number of these editions of this book. I usually wear them out! They are like the go to "bible" for natural healing.

When doctors cannot help you and you have no where else to turn, or perhaps you just want to heal yourself naturally, this book is amazing. Laid out in such an easy to follow format with eating patterns that would be best for certain ailments, what herbs to take, what natural methods to use. I highlight mine and turn to it all the time for simple ailments to arthritis to whatever. I have nothing negative to say about this book.

In the digital age, this is one very nice actual book to have in your hands for reference! This series of books has been my mainstay for years--since I was diagnosed with what they then termed as terminal, with no known treatment. I used it to look up every element of my illness, then began a regimen of supplements geared to each.

A wasting disease; no help; no hope; future is rapid degeneration. Yes, 12 years ago. One of the combined three diagnosed problems has totally disappeared--which I was told doesn't happen a drug-resistant bacterium gone. The main problem has stabilized for many years--once I was told it was somewhat improved and "that has never happened before. In the early 20th century, Carl von Voit and Max Rubner independently measured caloric energy expenditure in different species of animals, applying principles of physics in nutrition.

In , Edith G. Willcock and Frederick Hopkins showed that the amino acid tryptophan aids the well-being of mice but it did not assure their growth. Babcock and Edwin B. Hart started the cow feeding, single-grain experiment , which took nearly four years to complete. In , Casimir Funk coined the term vitamin , a vital factor in the diet, from the words "vital" and "amine," because these unknown substances preventing scurvy, beriberi, and pellagra , were thought then to be derived from ammonia.

The vitamins were studied in the first half of the 20th century. In , Elmer McCollum and Marguerite Davis discovered the first vitamin, fat-soluble vitamin A , then water-soluble vitamin B in ; now known to be a complex of several water-soluble vitamins and named vitamin C as the then-unknown substance preventing scurvy.

In , Sir Edward Mellanby incorrectly identified rickets as a vitamin A deficiency because he could cure it in dogs with cod liver oil. Bishop discover vitamin E as essential for rat pregnancy, originally calling it "food factor X" until In , Hart discovered that trace amounts of copper are necessary for iron absorption. In , Albert Szent-Györgyi isolated ascorbic acid , and in proved that it is vitamin C by preventing scurvy. In , he synthesized it, and in , he won a Nobel Prize for his efforts.

Szent-Györgyi concurrently elucidated much of the citric acid cycle. In the s, William Cumming Rose identified essential amino acids , necessary protein components that the body cannot synthesize. In , Underwood and Marston independently discovered the necessity of cobalt. In , Eugene Floyd DuBois showed that work and school performance are related to caloric intake.

In , Erhard Fernholz discovered the chemical structure of vitamin E and then he tragically disappeared. In , rationing in the United Kingdom during and after World War II took place according to nutritional principles drawn up by Elsie Widdowson and others. In , The U. Department of Agriculture introduced the Food Guide Pyramid. The list of nutrients that people are known to require is, in the words of Marion Nestle , "almost certainly incomplete".

Some nutrients can be stored - the fat-soluble vitamins - while others are required more or less continuously.

Poor health can be caused by a lack of required nutrients, or for some vitamins and minerals, too much of a required nutrient.

The macronutrients are carbohydrates , fiber , fats , protein , and water. Some of the structural material can be used to generate energy internally, and in either case it is measured in Joules or kilocalories often called "Calories" and written with a capital C to distinguish them from little 'c' calories. Vitamins, minerals, fiber, and water do not provide energy, but are required for other reasons. Molecules of carbohydrates and fats consist of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms.

Carbohydrates range from simple monosaccharides glucose, fructose and galactose to complex polysaccharides starch. Fats are triglycerides , made of assorted fatty acid monomers bound to a glycerol backbone. Some fatty acids, but not all, are essential in the diet: Protein molecules contain nitrogen atoms in addition to carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen. The fundamental components of protein are nitrogen-containing amino acids , some of which are essential in the sense that humans cannot make them internally.

Some of the amino acids are convertible with the expenditure of energy to glucose and can be used for energy production, just as ordinary glucose, in a process known as gluconeogenesis. By breaking down existing protein, the carbon skeleton of the various amino acids can be metabolized to intermediates in cellular respiration; the remaining ammonia is discarded primarily as urea in urine. Carbohydrates may be classified as monosaccharides , disaccharides , or polysaccharides depending on the number of monomer sugar units they contain.

They constitute a large part of foods such as rice , noodles , bread , and other grain -based products, also potatoes , yams, beans, fruits, fruit juices and vegetables.

Monosaccharides, disaccharides, and polysaccharides contain one, two, and three or more sugar units, respectively. Polysaccharides are often referred to as complex carbohydrates because they are typically long, multiple branched chains of sugar units.

Traditionally, simple carbohydrates are believed to be absorbed quickly, and therefore to raise blood-glucose levels more rapidly than complex carbohydrates. This, however, is not accurate. Dietary fiber is a carbohydrate that is incompletely absorbed in humans and in some animals. Like all carbohydrates, when it is metabolized it can produce four Calories kilocalories of energy per gram. However, in most circumstances it accounts for less than that because of its limited absorption and digestibility.

Dietary fiber consists mainly of cellulose, a large carbohydrate polymer which is indigestible as humans do not have the required enzymes to disassemble it. There are two subcategories: Whole grains, fruits especially plums , prunes , and figs , and vegetables are good sources of dietary fiber. There are many health benefits of a high-fiber diet. Dietary fiber helps reduce the chance of gastrointestinal problems such as constipation and diarrhea by increasing the weight and size of stool and softening it.

Insoluble fiber, found in whole wheat flour , nuts and vegetables, especially stimulates peristalsis ;— the rhythmic muscular contractions of the intestines, which move digest along the digestive tract. Soluble fiber, found in oats, peas, beans, and many fruits, dissolves in water in the intestinal tract to produce a gel that slows the movement of food through the intestines. This may help lower blood glucose levels because it can slow the absorption of sugar.

Additionally, fiber, perhaps especially that from whole grains, is thought to possibly help lessen insulin spikes, and therefore reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. The link between increased fiber consumption and a decreased risk of colorectal cancer is still uncertain. A molecule of dietary fat typically consists of several fatty acids containing long chains of carbon and hydrogen atoms , bonded to a glycerol.

They are typically found as triglycerides three fatty acids attached to one glycerol backbone. Fats may be classified as saturated or unsaturated depending on the detailed structure of the fatty acids involved. Saturated fats have all of the carbon atoms in their fatty acid chains bonded to hydrogen atoms, whereas unsaturated fats have some of these carbon atoms double-bonded , so their molecules have relatively fewer hydrogen atoms than a saturated fatty acid of the same length.

Unsaturated fats may be further classified as monounsaturated one double-bond or polyunsaturated many double-bonds. Furthermore, depending on the location of the double-bond in the fatty acid chain, unsaturated fatty acids are classified as omega-3 or omega-6 fatty acids. Trans fats are a type of unsaturated fat with trans -isomer bonds; these are rare in nature and in foods from natural sources; they are typically created in an industrial process called partial hydrogenation.

There are nine kilocalories in each gram of fat. Fatty acids such as conjugated linoleic acid , catalpic acid, eleostearic acid and punicic acid , in addition to providing energy, represent potent immune modulatory molecules.

Saturated fats typically from animal sources have been a staple in many world cultures for millennia. Saturated and some trans fats are typically solid at room temperature such as butter or lard , while unsaturated fats are typically liquids such as olive oil or flaxseed oil.

Trans fats are very rare in nature, and have been shown to be highly detrimental to human health, but have properties useful in the food processing industry, such as rancidity resistance.

Most fatty acids are non-essential, meaning the body can produce them as needed, generally from other fatty acids and always by expending energy to do so. However, in humans, at least two fatty acids are essential and must be included in the diet.

An appropriate balance of essential fatty acids— omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids —seems also important for health, although definitive experimental demonstration has been elusive. Both of these "omega" long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids are substrates for a class of eicosanoids known as prostaglandins , which have roles throughout the human body.

They are hormones , in some respects. The omega-3 eicosapentaenoic acid EPA , which can be made in the human body from the omega-3 essential fatty acid alpha-linolenic acid ALA , or taken in through marine food sources, serves as a building block for series 3 prostaglandins e. The omega-6 dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid DGLA serves as a building block for series 1 prostaglandins e. An appropriately balanced intake of omega-3 and omega-6 partly determines the relative production of different prostaglandins, which is one reason why a balance between omega-3 and omega-6 is believed important for cardiovascular health.

In industrialized societies, people typically consume large amounts of processed vegetable oils, which have reduced amounts of the essential fatty acids along with too much of omega-6 fatty acids relative to omega-3 fatty acids. Moreover, the conversion desaturation of DGLA to AA is controlled by the enzyme deltadesaturase , which in turn is controlled by hormones such as insulin up-regulation and glucagon down-regulation.

The amount and type of carbohydrates consumed, along with some types of amino acid, can influence processes involving insulin, glucagon, and other hormones; therefore, the ratio of omega-3 versus omega-6 has wide effects on general health, and specific effects on immune function and inflammation , and mitosis i.

Proteins are structural materials in much of the animal body e. They also form the enzymes that control chemical reactions throughout the body. Each protein molecule is composed of amino acids , which are characterized by inclusion of nitrogen and sometimes sulphur these components are responsible for the distinctive smell of burning protein, such as the keratin in hair.

The body requires amino acids to produce new proteins protein retention and to replace damaged proteins maintenance. As there is no protein or amino acid storage provision, amino acids must be present in the diet.

Excess amino acids are discarded, typically in the urine. For all animals, some amino acids are essential an animal cannot produce them internally and some are non-essential the animal can produce them from other nitrogen-containing compounds. About twenty amino acids are found in the human body, and about ten of these are essential and, therefore, must be included in the diet. A diet that contains adequate amounts of amino acids especially those that are essential is particularly important in some situations: A complete protein source contains all the essential amino acids; an incomplete protein source lacks one or more of the essential amino acids.

It is possible with protein combinations of two incomplete protein sources e. However, complementary sources of protein do not need to be eaten at the same meal to be used together by the body. Water is excreted from the body in multiple forms; including urine and feces , sweating , and by water vapour in the exhaled breath. Therefore, it is necessary to adequately rehydrate to replace lost fluids.

Early recommendations for the quantity of water required for maintenance of good health suggested that 6—8 glasses of water daily is the minimum to maintain proper hydration. Most of this quantity is contained in prepared foods. For healthful hydration, the current EFSA guidelines recommend total water intakes of 2.

These reference values include water from drinking water, other beverages, and from food. The EFSA panel also determined intakes for different populations. Recommended intake volumes in the elderly are the same as for adults as despite lower energy consumption, the water requirement of this group is increased due to a reduction in renal concentrating capacity.

Dehydration and over-hydration - too little and too much water, respectively - can have harmful consequences. Drinking too much water is one of the possible causes of hyponatremia , i. Pure ethanol provides 7 calories per gram. For distilled spirits , a standard serving in the United States is 1. A 5 ounce serving of wine contains to calories. A 12 ounce serving of beer contains 95 to calories.

Alcoholic beverages are considered empty calorie foods because other than calories, these contribute no essential nutrients. The micronutrients are minerals , vitamins , and others. Dietary minerals are inorganic chemical elements required by living organisms, [70] other than the four elements carbon , hydrogen , nitrogen , and oxygen that are present in nearly all organic molecules.

The term "mineral" is archaic, since the intent is to describe simply the less common elements in the diet. Some are heavier than the four just mentioned, including several metals , which often occur as ions in the body. Some dietitians recommend that these be supplied from foods in which they occur naturally, or at least as complex compounds, or sometimes even from natural inorganic sources such as calcium carbonate from ground oyster shells.

Some minerals are absorbed much more readily in the ionic forms found in such sources. On the other hand, minerals are often artificially added to the diet as supplements; the most famous is likely iodine in iodized salt which prevents goiter.

Many elements are essential in relative quantity; they are usually called "bulk minerals". Some are structural, but many play a role as electrolytes. Many elements are required in trace amounts, usually because they play a catalytic role in enzymes. Vitamins are essential nutrients, [70] necessary in the diet for good health. Vitamin D is an exception, as it can be synthesized in the skin in the presence of UVB radiation , and many animal species can synthesize vitamin C.

Vitamin deficiencies may result in disease conditions, including goitre , scurvy , osteoporosis , impaired immune system, disorders of cell metabolism, certain forms of cancer, symptoms of premature aging, and poor psychological health , among many others. Phytochemicals such as polyphenols are compounds produced naturally in plants phyto means "plant" in Greek. In general, the term is used to refer to compounds which do not appear to be nutritionally essential and yet may have positive impacts on health.

To date, there is no conclusive evidence in humans that polyphenols or other non-nutrient compounds from plants have health benefit effects. While initial studies sought to reveal if nutrient antioxidant supplements might promote health, one meta-analysis concluded that supplementation with vitamins A and E and beta-carotene did not convey any benefits and may in fact increase risk of death. Vitamin C and selenium supplements did not impact mortality rate.

Health effects of non-nutrient phytochemicals such as polyphenols were not assessed in this review. Animal intestines contain a large population of gut flora. In humans, the four dominant phyla are Firmicutes , Bacteroidetes , Actinobacteria , and Proteobacteria.

Bacteria in the large intestine perform many important functions for humans, including breaking down and aiding in the absorption of fermentable fiber, stimulating cell growth, repressing the growth of harmful bacteria, training the immune system to respond only to pathogens, producing vitamin B 12 , and defending against some infectious diseases.

There is not yet a scientific consensus as to health benefits accruing from probiotics or prebiotics. Carnivore and herbivore diets are contrasting, with basic nitrogen and carbon proportions vary for their particular foods. Many herbivores rely on bacterial fermentation to create digestible nutrients from indigestible plant cellulose, while obligate carnivores must eat animal meats to obtain certain vitamins or nutrients their bodies cannot otherwise synthesize.

Plant nutrition is the study of the chemical elements that are necessary for plant growth. Some elements are directly involved in plant metabolism. However, this principle does not account for the so-called beneficial elements, whose presence, while not required, has clear positive effects on plant growth.

Nutrition Research Database Provides Nutrition Reports for Foods and Supplements